DIY: Felted Jewelry Pouch Tutorial


felted-jewelry-pouch

I’m proud of the people I come from and I happen to be the lucky recipient and caretaker of some of their most cherished pieces of jewelry.

mom 1940

Isn’t this dress amazing!

Mother's Day

Mother's Day

  Aren’t they beautiful!

And they were a big part of the Washington DC social scene in the late 1800s and early 1900s. My great grandmother kept extensive scrapbooks complete with hand written notes written to her from Grace Coolidge and White House party invitations. There is even a signed letter from Theodore Roosevelt amongst the many, calling cards, photos, newspaper articles and cards.

Shesh-ka-bob!

I’ve got some pretty deeply entrenched history in the DC area. My grandmother lived on Dupont Circle until 1988. Uncles, grandfathers and great grandfathers are buried in Arlington Cemetery. And as a matter of fact, there is a bridge named after my great grandfather there-The Kutz Bridge. And that is only the beginning of the accomplishments of these people who were here before me. (And yes, these are the women who came down the pipe from Pocahontas.🙂 )

I mean seriously, who wouldn’t be proud!

It’s fun to imagine them wearing their jewelry to some of the grand social engagements they attended in DC. I’ve had these treasures wrapped up and safely tucked away in a box. But wouldn’t it be a fun way to honor their memory by placing a few of their beloved pieces in a soft, handmade, lambswool and angora jewelry pouch, where I could easily take them out, keep them organized and possibly wear of few of them?

jewel

So……… I put together two jewelry pouches.

One for me and one for you along with this tutorial.

eHow has graciously published my tutorial once again, and to thank you for taking time out from your busy days to pin and make comments, (I’m a sucker for your kind words, what can I say?)

(Minus Grandma’s earring, though. Sorry, can’t seem to part with that.🙂 )

felted-jewelry-pouch

Do you have some great stories about your people? I’d love to hear about them.

P.S.

Yesterday morning, I met with Alicyn from BurdaStyle and we did a run through on Monday’s web seminar. This past week I’ve been busy putting it all together for you and I’m excited to say now, I’M READY!!!

I can’t believe it’s almost here!

I really hope you can join us for the live version, but if you aren’t able to make it on Monday to actually hear my funny voice🙂, you can still sign up and you will receive a copy to watch and listen to anytime you’d like.

To register, go here:

Refashion: Inspiration and Projects to Revamp and Recycle Your Wardrobe for Less

Enjoy your weekend!

Beth

PSS

While you’re over at eHow check out my new fellow craft bloggers:

Tonia Larsen has a tutorial for these playful scented Easter eggs:

scented_easter_eggs

and Amy Sinibaldi has a tutorial for these cute Brown Bunny Treat Bags:

weebrownbunnylinentreatbags

It’s an honor to be able to blog with these talented women!

For more refashion inspiration:

Refashion Tutorials

About The Renegade Seamstress

I'm a busy wife, mom, grandma, and teacher who loves to create. I've joined the refashion scene and I 'd like to share and connect with all those talented and creative people out there doing similar things.
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27 Responses to DIY: Felted Jewelry Pouch Tutorial

  1. Great Idea Beth! So gorgeous and I love the history, pictures, and fashion behind it all. My Grandmother came over on the orphan train. A good deal of her history is lost, but I have a great story to share with my students about the orphan train and its history. I am about to start my sewing fest. How about you?

    • Hi Mary, I bet your grandmother was a very strong woman after coming over on the orphan trail. My sewing fest is just winding down, I’ll be back to school next week. Have a fun sewing extravaganza! I can’t wait to see your creations!

  2. mari says:

    My my, I did not realize what a vast heritage you had Beth…..very cool that so much was saved and passed along to be enjoyed. I love reading about your history and of course miss you!

  3. Margaret says:

    Thank you for sharing your story with us, Beth — and what a pretty way to store those special pieces! I would love to win the pouch!

  4. Amanda Thompson says:

    The pictures of your family are beautiful. You come from a great heritage.
    The felted purse is a lovely idea to store such treasured pieces in.
    One of the things I know about my family is that they were Huguenots who fled from France to England in the late 18th Century bringing their weaving and association with silk with them.I’d love to think that’s where I get my love of fabrics from! The oldest girl in each generation of our family also inherits some Huguenots coins from that time (unfortunately that’s not me!).

  5. lovely story about your family and very cute jewelry pouches!

  6. Sue V. says:

    What a sweet way to store and protect those precious jeweled heirlooms! Sure beats the zip-lock bags I’ve been using! I enjoyed reading about your great-grandmother and grandmother. So wonderful that you are treasuring your familial roots!

  7. beautiful photos and heritage…
    http://babyjill7.wordpress.com/2013/06/13/treasures-left-from-my-daddy/
    this is a story about my Dad…treasures he left me…

  8. seweverythingblog says:

    Loved this post! Love the history of families and the family jewels ( I have a few). All three are beautiful women and your grandmother’s dress seems so on-trend!

  9. A wonderful idea. Thank you for sharing it and part of your history.

  10. debbielynne says:

    Beautiful – pinning for sure!

  11. Bob says:

    So how do I watch this when we have to work on Monday???? Debbie

  12. Debi Askew says:

    I;m set up for the seminar, but will I still have access to the recorded one so I can review things if I need to?

    myesig.com

    Date: Sat, 29 Mar 2014 13:15:51 +0000 To: crazy4cars@hotmail.com

  13. Jayne says:

    I’m ready for the seminar, too.

  14. vjstracener says:

    Those look soft and beautiful.

  15. amy says:

    You should be proud! I’m in awe of these photographs, and jealous you still have your ancestors jewelry.. Our house was robbed right after we moved in and all of my trinkets were taken😦 Although, luckily, I never had anything as precious as my grandmothers, or greats, to lose😉 You’ve created a beautiful way to store those keepsakes!

  16. Jo H. says:

    What a lovely, appealing jewelry pouch! Would never have thought that angora could be felted – so thanks for figuring that out and passing it on🙂

    You have a hugely interesting family tree!

  17. Joen says:

    Such amazing details of the clothes – drooling over them! I have two necklaces that were my grandmothers and I cherish!

  18. Jean C. says:

    My great grandfather came over from Germany years and years ago. He played the accordion on the ship to pay his passage over to the United States… then he went back and forth a few more times to earn money to pay passage for other family members. His grandson, my grampa Schwartz played in a band with Lawrence Welk before he had his own band. Granmpa S. could play most any instrument and could hear a song and then play it. Amazing man! He gave my gramma in 1920 a silver compact and she gave it to me 2 weeks before she passed away in the 1990’s.

  19. Oh goodness, love those dresses. I’ve always said I was born in the wrong era because I just love how they use to dress. Wouldn’t want to wear all the corsets and bindings though.

  20. Pingback: The Beauty of Bias Tape Part One: Make Your Own | The Renegade Seamstress

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